GPX Medical

GPX Medical AB develops medical technology for non-invasive diagnostics of medical complications in air-filled areas of the body, such as the lungs, sinuses and the intestines. The technology is based on spectroscopic methods developed by scientists at Lund University, Sweden.

 

SinusLight project

During 2018, a feasibility study has comprised a market analysis and an evaluation of the technical requirements for commercialisation of a hand-held medical device for diagnostic assessment of sinusitis. The study has identified the market and the user needs, as well as the resources and financial requirements needed to commercialise the technology. We are convinced that the project is well worth pursuing. The business case is realistic and convincing.

The results of the SinusLight project have reinforced that there is a very clear need for the GPX Medical device in terms of global health. Dr Bergsten sums up the massive implications brought about by the SinusLight review: “We see a great business potential in both applications, sinuses and lungs, and are now starting to execute the steps needed for taking these technologies to the market.”

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 790786

To learn more, please visit: https://cordis.europa.eu/result/rcn/241038_en.html?WT.mc_id=exp

 

Neo-Lung project

GPX Medical is the coordinator of a European project to develop technology for monitoring of lung function in preterm infants – Neo-Lung. Preterm infants, born in pregnancy week 22-30, often suffer complications due to undeveloped lungs. With the technology developed in the Neo-Lung project, we hope to be able to measure the air-filled lung volume and the oxygen content in the lungs, non-invasively and continously. This technology could reduce the need for x-ray examinations and invasive blood tests.

The Neo-Lung project is partly financed by EUREKA via the Eurostars programme. In addition to GPX Medical, commercial and academic partners from Sweden, Norway and Germany are involved.